A Eulogy to Britain’s Finest Hour

Harry Leslie Smith, who lost a sister to a world without public health care and then saw the National Health Service arise in the wake of World War II, laments the decimation of one of the finest products of Britain’s finest hour: My sister’s body was committed to a pauper’s pit and interred in an unmarked grave along with a dozen […]

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Does Grouping Students By Ability Work? Be Nice To Know.

From Today’s Times: Grouping Students by Ability Regains Favor With Educators: Though the issue is one of the most frequently studied by education scholars, there is little consensus about grouping’s effects.Some studies indicate that grouping can damage students’ self-esteem by consigning them to lower-tier groups; others suggest that it produces the opposite effect by ensuring that […]

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Neurocritic Asks, Where Are Psychiatry’s Clinical Tests?

In an age of laboratory medicine, psychiatry’s reliance on interviews, confession, and often funky diagnoses remain the disciplines great bugbear. The move over the last two or three decades to ‘biological psychiatry,’ which got hijacked by the drug industry, has hovered  between disappointment and disaster. Neurocritic looks at the dilemma from a neuroscientist’s point of view: […]

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