Chickens, William Blake, and Why The Limits of Science Don’t Matter

I’ve been slowly reading Roy Bedichek’s splendid and horrifically overlooked Adventures With A Texas Naturalist —  a 50-year-old book  fresh as any new bloom,  packed with smart talk about science  slipped into fine-grained observations about swallows, frogs, or, in this case, chickens. His family kept chickens when he was a boy growing up in Texas. How, […]

Continue reading →

How The Deniers Win: Question Motives

Updated 06/17/2013 11:16am EDT (see tail end of story) James Gilbert has the goods over at The Conversation: Climate sceptics have won, Martin Wolf lamented in the Financial Times, despite near-universal scientific consensus against them. The sheer longevity of this “debate” indicates deniers attract disproportionate attention – partly due to one of their main lines of attack: scientific bias. […]

Continue reading →

Science Publishes “Arsenic is Life” Critiques. Game On.

Alert readers will remember the scuffle that broke out last summer December over the “arsenic-is-life” paper by Felisa Wolfe-Simon and colleagues that claimed to have found that a bacterium from Mono Lake had been coaxed into substituting arsenic for phosphorous in its DNA. Many, including me, criticized both the paper and its presentation: the paper […]

Continue reading →

Guardian announces new blog network and scidom over the blogosphere

The Guardian launched a new blog network yesterday, with a strong lineup: GrrlScientist covering matters evo and orni (bird lovers, take note), Evan Harris covering policy and politics and such, Martin Robbins bringing the Lay Scientist to a new banner, and Jon Butterworth of UCL talking life and physics. I understand they’re planning to expand. You can […]

Continue reading →