Those Who Waited Get Impatient Too: or how new journo tools can get you out of old school

A couple weeks ago, Ed Yong published a talk by RadioLab’s Robert Krulwich that went viral in journalism and  science-writing circles, for good reason. Speaking to graduating journalism students at UC Berkeley, Krulwich, who does some fine blogging of his own, expressed his pleasure and wonder at how blogs, twitter, and other newish tools allow […]

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The Old is the New New. So Paleoblog, Will You?

A recent twitter exchange between Tim Carmody, Alexis Madrigal, Alison Arieff, and Brendan Koerner drew my attention to this nice Snarkmarket post from Carmody on digging up material from offline, which Carmody calls paleoblogging: Two weeks ago I praised Harper’s Scott Horton, who in addition to tiptop legal/political commentary regularly serves up poignant and relevant chunks […]

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Science bloggers diversify the news – w Hauser affair as case study

Over at CMBR, Colin Schultz blogs on a study that found that science bloggers in particular created more diverse, less self-referential, less echo-chamberish coverage of news than even most other blogospheric areas.

…Read those entries, and their comments, and you’ll find quite a diverse view — but one that produces a richer view of the affair, and sets useful context, rather than fogging things over or reducing things to a polarized simplistic discussion.

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McKenna & Blum (and her Pulitzer) leave ScienceBlogs

We had not been at that paper very long when stupid actions by his supervisors confronted him with a choice that no one who loves their work wants to make: Stay and be ethically compromised, or leave with intact standards and an empty wallet. … All these venues — and more are being formed as you read this — are all trying to figure out how to make money, and in doing so, must confront old questions (how to make money in a way that doesn’t compromise content) amid new financial and publications structures.

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Are bloggers journalists? BoraZ nails this slippery thang to the floor

We here at Scienceblogs, by virtue of moving from our individual blogs to the network, have largely left the realm of “distributed by individuals to each other”. … Which is why the blurring of lines between us who are hired and paid to write (due to our own qualities and expertise which we earned), and those who are paying to have their material published here is deeply unethical.

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