Why Do Military Brats Kick Butt in Reading and Math?

Helen Epstein, in an aside in her fine piece on public-health innovator Sara Josephine Baker, suggests it rises partly from the excellent healthcare, daycare, and social services we give our military: [T]here is one group of Americans that receives high-quality government-subsidized child-care services, including day care, preschool, home-visiting programs, and health care: the US military. […]

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Does Grouping Students By Ability Work? Be Nice To Know.

From Today’s Times: Grouping Students by Ability Regains Favor With Educators: Though the issue is one of the most frequently studied by education scholars, there is little consensus about grouping’s effects.Some studies indicate that grouping can damage students’ self-esteem by consigning them to lower-tier groups; others suggest that it produces the opposite effect by ensuring that […]

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Are You Part of Steven Pinker’s “Science-flunking Intellectual Elite”?

In a passage highlighted by Flip Chart Fairy Tales, Stephen Pinker, in an interview in The Observer last week, argues that statistical ignorance is our intellectual culture’s great failure. I think that a failure of statistical thinking is the major intellectual shortcoming of our universities, journalism and intellectual culture. Cognitive psychology tells us that the […]

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Dipstick: religious brains, more school, more meds, states rights, and dancing with the unwilling. Plus Ardi, free

This implies that religious beliefs and behavior emerged not as sui generis evolutionary adaptations, but as an extension (some would say “by product”) of social cognition and behavior. May be something to that, Razib says — but it would be nice “get in on the game of normal human variation in religious orientation (as opposed to studies of mystical brain states which seem focused on outliers).”

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